P(EYE) Day

India ink and ink on paper

Today’s piece is inspired by the mathematical constant that shares the same first three digits with today’s date, 3/14. Pi, 3.14 (15926 and on and on), as the ratio of a circle’s circumference, reminds me of the possibility the circle itself holds, reminds me of the circle’s ability to enclose and expand, all at once–much like an eye.

In A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe, Michael S. Schneider writes of the circle,

Expanding from the “nowhere” of its dimensionless center to the infinitely many points of its circumference, a circle implies the mysterious generation from nothing to everything. Its radius and circumference are never both measurable at the same time in similar units to to their mutual relation to the transcendental value known as “pi”+ 3.1415926… When either the radius or the circumference is measurable in whole, rational units, the other is a endless irrational decimal. Thus, a circle represents the limited and unlimited in one body.  

A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe, page 4

The poetry of the circle can also be found within our bodies; our eyes translate and communicate through out iris and pupil. We are also physically built to create perfect circles. Artist Nicole Collins demonstrates the body’s ability to create a perfect circle in this video with Art Gallery of Ontario.


In honor of “Pi Day”, here’s a creative prompt:
  1. Attach a large sheet of paper to a wall (just use the wall, if you have acess to a wall you can draw on).
  2. Stand directly in front of the wall, hand raised all the way above your head, with a piece of chalk in hand.
  3. Place the chalk on the wall (or wall and paper) and swing your arm around in a 360 degree turn. (Do not lift the chalk durring this process.)
  4. Repeat the motion a few times.
  5. Step back and enjoy the mathematical perfection
  6. Share this discovery with someone. If you share via Instagram or other social media sites use the hashtag #cogneyezant
  7. Attach a large sheet of paper to a wall (just use the wall, if you have access to a wall you can draw on).
  8. Stand directly in front of the wall, hand raised all the way above your head, with a piece of chalk in hand.
  9. Place the chalk on the wall (or wall and paper) and swing your arm around in a 360 degree turn. (Do not lift the chalk during this process.)
  10. Repeat the motion a few times. 
  11. Step back and enjoy the mathematical perfection.
  12. Share this discovery with someone. If you share via Instagram or other social media sites use the hashtag #cogneyezant
Posted by:nadiacdm